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Search Results 250 to 299 of about 844 (some duplicates have been removed)
, in many cases i believe it's related to the environment. and some of the issues that they're exposed to. and, so, i think it's critical that we start to look at people who are struggling in a more compassionate way. so, since i've been supervisor, one of the organizations that -- community-based organizations that i've been very impressed by is the west side community services. i think that the -- (applause) >> there are a lot of communities, communities of color. they still have stigma attached to that name, mental health. so, it's really incredible that these individuals in this agency that's run currently by dr. jones who does pretty incredible work in the community in the western addition. (applause) >> that, you know, that they provide culturally competent services. and, so, the person that we're honoring today is it a willis. she's the program coordinator from west side community services in the western edition. tia wallace has been faithfully and compassionately working with children youth and their familiesates west side community services for 12 years. * as the program coordina
here in the city. we protect public health and safety and environment because we are discharging into the bay and into the ocean. this is essentially the first treatment here at our waste water treatment facility. what we do is slow down the water so that things either settle to the bottom or float to the top. you see we have a nice selection of things floating around there, things from bubble gum wrappers, toilet paper, whatever you dump down the toilet, whatever gets into our storm drains, that's what gets into our waste water treatment and we have to clean. >> see these chains here, this keeps scum from building up. >> on this end in the liquid end basically we're just trying to produce a good water product that doesn't negatively impact the receiving water so that we have recreation and no bad impact on fish and aquatic life. solids is what's happening. . >> by sludge, what exactly do you mean? is that the actual technical term? . >> it's a technical term and it's used in a lot of different ways, but this is organic sewage sludge. basically what it is is, oh, maybe things tha
and various ethnic arms groups that have helped to create this environment of opium poppies been successfully grown again. for the last six years we have seen an increase in the cultivation area inside burma. yes, no underestimating the size of the challenge. a lot has changed in burma, but it will take a considered and concerted effort to tackle the problem. >> you are watching "bbc world news." headlines this hour, 40 people have been know to have died in the storm in the northeastern united states. tens of thousands of people have had to spend a second night in emergency shelters. you are familiar enough with these, of course. bananas are just about the most popular fruit in the world, but they could be replacing some staples in the parts of the world affected by climate change. the report commissioned by the un security council says that the production of these foods will decrease in many developing countries and that bananas might make a suitable replacement. joining me from edinburgh is an agricultural scientist with the climate change and food security research program. thank you very
with the high frequency trading environment. we're in an entirely different situation now in the last five years. even the locations. one of the very interesting parts of that is very mysterious about how could you have work if you had disruptions. >> tom: colocation is when a broker or trader puts their computer next to the exchange computer sometimes at the exchange. >> and finally, david, are you confident that the exchanges are ready to go tomorrow? >> i think they will be. if they say they are. this is a market situation. the exchanges know what's going on. they say they're ready. i'm confident they will be there. >> tom: you've been in that seat before. david ruder with us from the cme group, former chairman of the securities and exchange commission. >> tom: lincoln ellis is the chief investment officer with the strategic financial group. with us from chicago. do you think a cautious day of trading or a wild day of volatility? >> well, probably a bit of both. as you know, it's the month's end, and you have a fair amount of portfolio rebalancing that will happen tomorrow. that combineed wit
think of hope for the environment, or food, clothing, shelter? we do. weyerhaeuser, growing ideas. >> just going to keep on keeping on, until every single person out there who needs to vote is going to go vote. >> this week on "inside washington," the endgame. the last debate. >> nothing governor romney just said is true. attacking >> me is not talking about how we deal with the challenges in the middle east. >> the women's vote and the return of the abortion debate. >> i think even when life begins in that horrible situation of rape that it is something that god intended to happen. >> the colin powell endorsement. >> i was proud to learn that we have colin powell's support in this campaign. >> you have to wonder if that is based on issues or whether he has a slightly reason for preferring president obama -- a slightly different reason for preferring president obama. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> we are all most of their pit believe it or not, at the election is now less than two weeks away and both candidates are running as if there is no to
environment. >> as you go by the barbershop here, this is actually a conference room. >> it also has a candy store, a coffee shop and a main hallway better known as main street. that's where you'll find the community college. >> this is where we do a lot of our training. >> but the look of this marketing software firm isn't the only unusual thing. in a sluggish economy, this public company had 15% growth this year, and $170 million in revenue. and it's in prince george's. the county trailing surrounding counties and high-tech firms. according to a 2009 report from the maryland department of planning, montgomery county has 4400 high-tech firms. baltimore 1700. howard county 1600. and prince george's, an estimated 1400. >> it's become a really good location. >> vocus has called prince george's home since 1992 and moved into this 93,000 square foot warehouse in beltsville last year. >> the reason we started here was, he was halfway between where we both lived. that's what brought us here. but what's kept us here is it's really a great area, provides attraction to a lot of employees. >> there ar
the context of school in the rural environment. she did that for 25 years. she recognized that it was her entire life, that in order for her to live another chapter of her life, she had to leave the organization. at the same time she realized that the organization needed new leadership. so she really planned her exit very ritualized. the transition was done with great smoothness and alacrity and grace. what she discovered in leaving there was that in order to find her so low voice, in order to emerge to a new chapter, she had to leave the organization which had been a collective voice. she had organized and built that organization showed that it was a very collaborative organization. tavis: i want to give the reader a sense of how easy it is to navigate. since you mentioned alacrity and grace, i think we are all struggling with how, when we come upon these endings in our lives, how we exit with purposefulness, how we do it with dignity and grace. have you figured out the answer to that important question? >> the last chapter of the book is grace. as it should be, it is the final exit. it
of personalities in animals, the same as you see in people. some are aware of changes in the environment. animals handle it very well. we didn't have any issues with them. >> just like a lot of us, the aquarium workers were concerned about losing power and possible flooding but everything went smoothly. >>> tom, your first visit to dundalk, welcome. that's great. >> reporter: no. it wasn't too bad out there. it was definitely a situation where they had floodwaters, too as you guys have been talking about a lot of people are used to this has this tends to happen. basements were flooded. many backyards were flooded. this is the sort of thing they have to wait and hope this ends quickly. millers island they don't know if the high tide will come in, if the winds will change directions. police came to their doors, told them to evacuate and they heeded the warning. >> they said the water could get deeper, so we left. >> we still have hope. we're hoping it does not come into the house. if it does, we'll repair it. >> reporter: some good attitude from the residents who live in dundalk. i think a lot of t
them into interactive environments. it is giving tools to teachers. when kids get together, they are going to talk to each other and talk to the teachers. they will be rated on how good they are expressing themselves and interacting with their peers. >> the new book from salman khan is called "the one world schoolhouse." we have just scratched the surface on a very deep subject. it was a delight to have you on the program. that is our show for tonight. as always, thanks for watching. and keep the faith. >> for more information on today's show, visit tavis smiley at pbs.org. tavis: hi, i'm tavis smiley. join me next time for a conversation with -- a look at the final weeks of this campaign. that is next time. we will see you then. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunge
of how tough the environment is. bge is asking people for patience. the winds are still strong and it will take awhile to restore. >> let's puts it to you this way. we will be on for the rest of the night. we'll be on for the rest of the overnight. this is historic, a matter of your safety. to find your regular programming. >> we have a list of your family show's. vernal 463, come exaft -- comcast and direc-tv 2-2 our subchannels. those are the places to go. >> we'll put this on the crawl. >> we'll talk up until the first block of diane sawyer. we'll have her tell what the national outlook is and we'll come right back. >> this is a storm affecting over 60 million people. >> can i get an estimate how much time, ballpark time? >> about two minutes. >> this is amazing. it's kind of, you see it's pivoting around. this will probably come south to north, you know. >> so much information. it's unbelievable. a couple things, first off, the center will be crossing over northern delaware and northern baltimore county. we're going to have a period up to hurricane force winds from now unti
right now. it's -- a different environment than what we are used to. >> reporter: in terms of what they are going to do when they get to the communities in new jersey they expect to do it all. the teams are expected to head back to maryland in about a week. >> sandy may have spared many of the boats in the area but the waters are a whole different story. don harrison spent the day talking to chesapeake watermen. >> reporter: here -- a lot of water and keep their work boat this is a good time for the fishing business. when the gates open that changes anything things. mike middleton works the waters of the chesapeake. when the gatest the dam are opened the sediment and debris makes the trip down the bay. >> watermen do feel that -- the dam plays a big effect on the bay. in a negative draw. . >> reporter: just kind of shuts it down. economicly it's a huge impact to my business as well as anyone that's doing pretty much fishing right now. it's pretty big. >> reporter: it takes about two- or three-days for the debris and sediment to work down through the bay year and once it is the se
. (laughter) it takes time. they have to acclimate to their new environment. again, sir, let's do this for the kids. and for those of you who want to help the kids or anyone else, please go to redcross.org and give generously. together we can overcome this disaster. also, the hurricane. we'll be right back. (cheers and applause) ,x+ c4-x!-) (cheers and applause) welcome back, everybody, thank you very much. my guest tonight became the face of equal pay for women. tonightly pay her just as much attention as i pay my male guests. please welcome lilly ledbetter. (cheers and applause) ms. ledbetter, thank you so much for coming on. what a pleasure to have you on here. >> thank you, it's my pleasure to be here. >> stephen: where are you from originally? >> alabama. >> stephen: how long have you been in new york this week? >> since sunday. >> stephen: okay, perfect time to visit the city. >> absolutely. >> stephen: wonderful. did we bring you here? >> you did, i've been in three hotel this is week. >> stephen: how many? >> three. >> stephen: why did you move? >> well, the first one got
themselves quite well in the debates. but the point is, they're in this larger environment, what is going to go on. i worry we're going to see muddling through instead of clear-cut tax reform, infrastructure program, clear-cut ways to improve education. >> joe, i remember a couple of years ago -- >> i do it every year. >> but a series of wonderful articles, before the midterm for "time" magazine. you talked over a lot of the midwest, middle class. and you found that the -- china came up ten times as often as afghanistan -- >> 20. >> 20 types as often as afghanistan. when you look at the -- what an average middle-class american family is facing, particularly kind of people who work in factories, they're up against probably a generation of this kind of wage competition and -- possibly wage deflation because of china, things. do you -- what do you think happens to the politics of america if that middle class is not appreciably better five, six, eight years from now? >> well, we're heading toward, i think, a demographic period of real difficulty as the white majority declines. and there's --
from financials. how much worse will it get? >> it's also the regulatory environment. the barclays particularly in this country, a whole focus on bank management pay and so on. so clearly they're trying to respond to that regulatory and social push for lower pay to bank management. so with all of this in mind, if they can control costs, they can refocus business on either higher margin business or better quality business, at some point will be profitable. >> it broaden out to the market in general, you point out that, yes, earnings have been relatively in line with the paths. beating estimates like two-third of the time, but falling short on the revenue side. it doesn't necessarily point to a stronger market longer term. >> to me the early season in the u.s. has been poor. share negative for the first time in three years year on year. and revenue growth will be one of the key metrics to look at in the current environment. if nominal terms these countries cannot generate growth, what ask z. it mean for the global economy. >> 63% of cash flow is going to buy backs. what were the sect
this industry is still a terrific fit for the times we're in. it ain't no boom here. an environment of high unemployment, slow wage growth, expensive gas prices, you better believe that consumers are still going to trade down to cheaper merchandise. and the merchandise is about as goo good as it gets. plus, imagine how good dollar general can do if washington pushes the economy back into a recession. not only would this company be immune to the pain, nor and more consumers would be forced to squeeze down even as our nation obviously would be hurt badly bypassing over the fiscal cliff. look, we've had a stagnant economy for ages. how come i'm recommending it now? the easy, it's cheap. it's fallen from its highs and thanks to equity investors have sold some of their shares. but mainly on account of the not so hot numbers we got from dollar tree. see, dollar tree cut its same-store sales guidance in the third quarter recently blaming high gasoline prices and the preholiday calendar shift. the forecast hammered the whole group. but i don't think their alibis add up. let's take them one at a tim
oink texan up rolls a bunch of -- text and up rolls a bunch of of people within the kick environment who you may or may not know and you can start a chat. >> reporter: another app is called snap chat take a picture send it to a friend who has 10 seconds to view it before it disappears. >> snap was released the press called it the sexting app because there would be no record of photos sent. >> reporter: pictures don't necessarily disappear, they say the company warns users it is not able to guarantee messages will be delighted -- deleted in all instances users can capture a photo before it vanishes by taking a screen shot. >> some use it to take funny photos and stu but i know some others use it for sending inappropriate or sexual photos. >> reporter: i-finance any trends high in the app store, -- i-funny trends high in the app store, it can be used as a creative tool that parents -- parents be warned. >> on the flip side open source environment so the kids are exposed to a lot of an humor they may or may not be ready for. >> reporter: most teens entertain themselves by flipping throu
with such an outrageous and dangerous view on our changing environment is the ranking member of the committee of environment and public works. maybe, maybe hurricane sandy will convince the senator and his fellow deniers that global warming is a very real threat but i wouldn't hold my breath. inhoff is actually in bed with big oil and big gas. the industry has given him more than half a million dollars. joining me to discuss the very real threat of global warming and the language of climate change is one of my favorites professor george, also the author of "the little blue book" the essential guide to thinking democratic. welcome back inside "the war room." >> always a pleasure to be here. >> jennifer: always a pleasure to have you. you wrote an article today for "the huffington post" and in that article, you said that global warming systemically caused hurricane sandy and you emphasized this issue of causation but systemic causation. explain what you meant. >> well, every language in the world can express what's called direct
it in a responsible way for our economy, for our environment and also to make sure that people are safe on their jobs. >> we need to get away from our reliance on foreign energy. we are taking some good steps in that direction. we have some great examples right here in peoria. with the ag lab. they are researching something that has great potential. as higher oil content than soy beans. it can be planted in the off- season. and has great potential to be used as an alternative biofuel. within the 17th congressional district, we have examples of solar farms. we have examples of wind farms. and did a favor of keeping the wind farm subsidy. that is currently being fought by the republican presidential nominee. i am at a favor of that. we have a district that can be a leader in the united states for helping us come up with alternative energy sources and get away from the rely on foreign tule. i'm very excited about the possibility. very excited about how the ag lab can play a major part in that. i think, let's use this area as an example that we can hold up around the rest of the country. >> rebuttal from
through here. >> the island has been settled for over 400 years. it is a very urban environment. it is not like some of the areas for long island and recent histories with houses way out onto beach territory. some of them situated. it is not the kind of island environment where you think of yourselves as having ocean on the sides and i was born and raised here on staten island and so were my mom and dad. staten island has had a feeling of what you had said. the complete opposite. there was never a threat. people never thought that there would be problems with the tides. here on staten island. and i think that is what caught a lot of people off guard here on staten island was that we never thought something like this could happen. we do have many beautiful houses and beautiful community that is are on the coast lines of our island. and we never thought there would be a problem like this. and i think that caught a lot of people off guard. >> michael cusik thank you very much for joining us tonight. tomorrow night, msnbc will host a concert and telethon to raise money for the ameri
. small businesses are taxed at 35%. that is not sustainable in this environment today. we have to change the loopholes at the top. big companies like ge and others pay no taxes and small companies pay up to 35%. we need to make it fair to everybody. first and foremost, we have to create an environment that our small businesses can thrive. when we look at the uniqueness on the border that is different and the tax reform or the nation, we need immigration reform. as i travel the border and i meet with agricultural people, we have a work force problem because the immigration system and the visa system is broken. these problems trade an impediment to congress. we have to be able to provide a -- these problems create an impediment to congress meant -- an impediment to commerce. we are not able to do that because of the impediments that are there by not having an effective comprehensive immigration policy. that becomes an economic issue as well. the workers here who want to work, there is not enough of them. the workers who come across the border to take care of the ranches and agricultural in
at the cia outpost it the security environment degraded suddenly. there was an agreement to formal weekly meet to go discuss the security environment. in the longer term we believe formal location with the annex will greatly improve our security situation. moving the consulate operations to the ci operations might not have ultimately saved the lives of the four americans, including ambassador chris stevens. the annex came under fire in the second wave of attacks and it former navy seals died defending their colleagues there. >> thank you. >> you're welcome. >> early voting set to wrap up tomorrow notice crucial battleground state of florida." but the lines are so long some are asking for an extension. the florida league of women's votes say the wait could discourage people from voting at all. the florida's governor said he's not budging. phil is in florida are. it is my understanding the governor is also calling for an extension? >> the early voting line here in miami, dade county, just to showcase one location, has been three and a half hours long all day long today. the line still sits
. >> reporter: you think dangerous environment? >> very dangerous. there is people with needles, there is people that come in there with knives, guns. it is not an environment for children. >> reporter: maybe that's why they wouldn't let us film inside. for some, there are strains of hurricane katrina and the desperate scenes in the superdome. for others here who are homeless before, this is at least something and they're grateful for that. >> i had a blanket last night. i had a meal last night. i had everything i needed last night. >> that was richard engel reporting. when we come back, it was the storm after the storm, why the city decided to cancel the new york city marathon for the first time in its history. jack! come on, stop the car. jack! no, no, no, no, no! the only thing more surprising than finding the perfect gifts.. niice. ...is where you find them. how did you know? i had a little help. this is how to gift. this is sears. you ari can't see. ooh, turn up the brightness. it's already up oh, oh, ooh, sorry buddy, you know some of us destroy zombies and some of us feed em. how am i sup
operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. ♪ [ male announcer ] introducing the all-new completely re-imagined 2013 chevrolet malibu. sleek new styling... sophisticated dual cockpit design, and sport sculpted seats. available chevrolet mylink infotainment system. the all-new 2013 chevrolet malibu. ♪ refined comfort to get you in a malibu state of mind no matter what state you live in. ♪ >>> we're awaiting president obama in a swing state of ohio. meantime, in another swing state, that of virginia, bill clinton campaigning on behalf of the president. let's listen in at chesapeake, virginia, at indiana river high school. [ applause ] >> i don't know about you, but i'd rather you save the gasoline and export the oil if that's what we need to do. and that's why governor romney is having such a hard time breaking through in ohio. so what did he do? he ran -- he put -- he put a bogus ad on saying that for president had allowed jeep to move jobs to china. then he said the president had allowed chrysler, which owns jeep, to move jobs to ch
gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. busy in here. yeah. progressive mobile is. [ "everybody have fun tonight" plays ] really catching on! people can do it all! get a quote, buy and manage your policy! -[ music stops ] -it's great! well, what's with the... -[ music resumes ] -music? ♪ have fun tonight dude. getting a car insurance quote. i'll let it go to voicemail. [ clears throat ] ♪ everybody wang chung tonight ♪ putting it on vibrate. [ cell phone vibrates ] -[ loud vibrating ] -it'll pass. [ vibrating continues ] our giant store and your little phone. that's progressive mobile. lou: the final jobs report before the presintial election showing little progress made durin
an economic environment where they can be successful. >> the president is here and said that ohio is one of those states that prove his economic policiless are working. how do you respond to the president if he makes those claims? >> i would say it is it just the opposite. they are hurting. we can gobetter if we had a real partner in washington who understood what it takes to create jobs. through our effort and initiative. we are reforming our regulations and at the same time the federal government is pushing more regulations and obamacare and the affect that is it going to have on government spending and more tax dollars spent on medicaid after it is it implement the impact it will center on ohio. >> i loved csi. common sense initiate itch. because it is it a name that is trendy, but i loved that we will assem pel the top business people and ask them. if you can set government policy to cause you to create jobs whampt is it going to be. and so what did they tell you specifically would help them create jobs in ohio? obviously it has worked. >> we have been meeting and thank you for mengi
. >> at the katherine ferguson academy in detroit, the soul of the school, andrews has created a loving environment not just for her students but also for their babies. >> last year she was in the infant room, now she's in the junior toddler room. everything they teach the kids in there is great. >> one of four high schools in the u.s. designated exclusively for high school mothers. with 220 students, the academy, which caters to pregnant teens and teen moms wasn't always like this. 26 years ago, principal andrews housed babies in a crib in her office. >> it was a little program that was hidden, nobody knew about it. >> reporter: as the demand increased, andrews saw the importance of creating an environment supportive of teen moms, but also gave their babies a head start. >> what do the moms get coming to this school they wouldn't get in another school? >> they get a staff that is focused on them. that is not mad about them being pregnant or parenting, who celebrate the fact that even though they're pregnant and parenting, they're still in school and they're participating in making a life for thems
, and big premier names started in absolutely awful economic environments. i mean, microsoft in the mid-70s, and same is said of dell, of apple, and yet they grew and thrived to be the giants they are of varying degrees today. >> yep. neil: what do you think is going on under the surface that guys like me in the media miss that as we are pooing the general economy d technology, what are we missing? >> well, you know, my many decades of working with proctor and gamble prior to microsoft give me a clear answer to what you t on the table, namely, if you put a product in front of someone that's truly excited clear benefits, easy to use, they know how to use it, let me tell you, you do create excitement. that's what t free enterprise systems about here in america, and the best products win, and right now, we got some exciting ones on that table. neil: so guys like you and roar, you know, visionaries, and i would throw you certainly in that camp. you don't necessarily overly focus on things ike a fiscal cliff or europe going to hell in a handbasket. you're aware of that, but if you're aware of t
or were the brokers not ready to operate in that environment? this is a big question. i will tell you this, liz, you want exchanges to be open now. i don't care what anybody -- a storm should not shut down capitalism. liz: wait even if it's --? >> no. liz: you shut down the floor but keep the electronic trading going. >> in this environment we can trade stocks in milliseconds. a storm, rain should not stop the new york stock exchange from opening its system. it should not stop the nasdaq or any of them. a small investor, maybe some trader can't get to work that works at goldman sachs, that's fine. but the bottom line is, the average investor should be able to trade stocks, buy a stock right now when they want. the system should not be shut down because of the storm. and it's absurd when you think about it. we've had years and years of technology -- liz: well traders were e-mailing me and said i'm upset, i wanted to go to work, i can handle this. >> it is one thing to be physically on the floor. the question is for a small investor and these markets are for the public too, by the way. the a
representing how man must spend trillions of dollars in an environment where we don't have trillions of dollars to do much of anything. why is it always the case? to what end? >> well, you know, global warming has been the most successful green scam and it is a tremendous tool of the laughter at the left is just now starting to embrace global warming as a means towards government control of everything of the economy and socialism. you know, when you tell people that capitalism and the free market is destroying the environment, people get scared. they are willing to turn over control of their lives and the economy to the central planners and that is the goal. neil: so when you look at it, you are trying to debunk what has been popular, mainstream media nonsense. do you look at what has been happening recycle is -- i mean, the fame meteorologist joe, we go through these periods of intense weather patterns and we misinterpret them in the middle of them. it has little to do with intense weather patterns. when people say that they have signs that show that humans are harming the climate, i can call
supplies are going down. they are going down because of the burdens and regulatory environments shutting down power plants. what we have to do is look at my energy plan. it is an all of the above approach. we have to ensure that we put more plants in action. more nuclear facilities so america continues to lead economically. if we put ourselves at an economic disadvantage because we are meeting emissions targets that are already doing better than most industrialized we hold let's make sure anybody else accountable in the world. start worrying about the american energy and american economy. the pipeline, that is thousands of jobs that can be created right now in america with a signature from president obama. that needs to happen. let's make sure we maximize our missions controls, we utilize natural gas, and we look at expanding our nuclear options here in this country. >> 30 seconds. >> renewals can take care of -- i do not claim renewable can take care of all our energies at this time. we need to take a big step forward. we find ourselves unable to when we have people beholden to oil and
declared cyberspace the environment of people and machines and networks as a new domain of the war and yet we realized that maybe one in a thousand people really understood what cyberspace was and the degree and death of the vulnerabilities. and so, what we are trying to do in the series is take pieces of it and explain the fundamentals and the platonic idea is that everybody from my mom and dad and congress and people around the country can understand and so maybe start the process of coming up with ways to defend cyberspace better. we have a pretty simple proposition. you can either embrace the kind of approach commerce one wilson has embraced. she signed the pledge to support the cut cabin balance program. that's a tea party approach to balancing the budget and it has no new revenues even for the wealthiest americans. and it is so draconian that would require deep cuts in social security and medicare over time or we can member is a balanced approach. that's what i support and i think we can go back to the kind of tax rates we had under the clinton administration and those upper income e
environment. when jack markell ran he put together a blueprint for delaware. we have not done a good enough job of creating that environment. >> let us go to the follow up. we stand on the blueprint for delaware? >> we still of war to go. some of them we did not have the resources. i said we ought to agree to dollar version. we have not been able to add as much as we would like. mr. gregg can say hispanic, but it is not spin. it is not spin to the people -- jeff craig can say is sprin. in. these are real jobs, real family is being put back to work. >> feel free to offer your opinion. >> it is then 30,000 unemployed from 18,000 additional who have dropped out of the workforce, people of taken part-time jobs, we can argue, but on election day those people will go to the polls and make a decision. >> of cited the high percentage of people in delaware and a part of their paychecks from the government. if you are to trim down the government are produced exasperatingly problem? >> i moved to delaware in the late 1980's. today the largest employer is the state of delaware, the second largest is th
Search Results 250 to 299 of about 844 (some duplicates have been removed)